My Blog

Posts for category: Child Care

By Virginia Pediatric Group
April 28, 2020
Category: Child Care

How your pediatricians in Fairfax, Herndon, Great Falls, and Aldie, VA, can help you and your child

The pediatricians at Virginia Pediatric Group are standing by to help you and your child through telemedicine visits. While our office telemedicinelocations in Fairfax, Herndon, Great Falls, and Aldie, VA, are still open during unique hours for office visits and curbside services, including COVID-19 testing (information available at www.vapg.com/covid-19). Our telemedicine services offer a unique way for your child to remain in the best of health, in your home during this time of social distancing.Telemedicine is a wonderful, convenient option for:

  • Rashes
  • Allergies and asthma
  • Pink eye
  • Vomiting, diarrhea, or constipation
  • Flu or cold symptoms
  • Lab testing or x-ray review
  • Issues or questions with lactation
  • Prenatal interviews
  • Questions about cuts, bites, or scrapes
  • Questions about sprains and other injuries
  • Questions or issues about medications
  • Skin conditions, including eczema or acne
  • Nutritional counseling
  • ADHD and behavioral health (anxiety, depression) evaluations and follow-ups

Most insurance companies are now covering preventive care visits and check ups and we have set up vaccination clinics in the office or “drive by” immunizations delivered to your car.

Before your telemedicine appointment, make sure that you and your child are in a room with good lighting and quiet surroundings. You should have a flashlight and hand mirror available in case you need to aid in an examination of your child. Additionally, make sure to have your pharmacy information handy, in case your child needs a prescription.

You begin your telemedicine appointment by accessing the website for Anytime Pediatrics and setting up an account. You will receive an email about your upcoming appointment. When you log in, you will be redirected to the virtual waiting room. Your visit may take between 10 and 20 minutes and your child should be with you during your telemedicine appointment.

If your child needs medical care, you can do it in the safety of your home. You can access excellent medical care from the experts, with telemedicine. To find out more about telemedicine and how it can help you and your child, call the pediatricians of Virginia Pediatric Group in Fairfax, Herndon, Great Falls, and Aldie, VA, at (703) 573-2432. We are there to help you.

By Virginia Pediatric Group
February 18, 2020
Category: Child Care
Tags: Asthma   Child  

Know the telltale signs and symptoms of childhood asthma.

Asthma is one of the most common chronic childhood diseases and it’s characterized by inflammation and narrowing of the airways. Certain irritants and pollutants can trigger a respiratory response. Our Fairfax, VA, pediatricians are experts at diagnosing and treating asthma in children and teens. Know the signs of asthma so that you know when to seek medical attention.

What are the symptoms of asthma?

While symptoms may develop at any age most symptoms will appear by the time a child turns 5 years old. Symptoms include:

  • Wheezing
  • Chest tightness
  • Chronic coughing that gets worse at night or with exercise
  • Shortness of breath
  • Fatigue, particularly with exercise
  • Trouble breathing
  • Rapid or shallow breathing

Any of these symptoms are disconcerting and it’s important that you turn to a pediatrician for a proper diagnosis. Not only can our Fairfax, VA, children’s doctors diagnose asthma but they can also help you and your child manage symptoms. Since asthma isn’t curable we can work with you to find the right medications to reduce asthma attacks and to get your child’s symptoms under control.

What triggers asthma?

One of the most major triggers of asthma is weather changes; therefore, you may find that springtime kicks up your child’s asthma symptoms, particularly if they are prone to allergies. Other triggers include:

  • Indoor allergies such as pet dander and dust mites
  • Cigarette smoke
  • Household cleaners, bug sprays, colognes, or scented lotions
  • Stress
  • Exercise
  • Cold, windy weather

How is asthma treated?

It’s important to understand what triggers your child’s asthma so that you can avoid it as much as necessary. When you know what triggers your child’s symptoms you can take actionable steps and create an effective treatment plan. This is something that our pediatricians can also help with. Along with an action plan we will often prescribe two medications: a long-term controlled medication and a quick-relief medication. Long-term medication is taken daily to control symptoms to prevent attacks, while quick-relief medications are used for rapid relief of symptoms when your child feels an attack coming on.

Virginia Pediatric Group located in Fairfax, VA, offers a full range of pediatric services, from immunizations and routine checkups to urgent medical care for children and teens. If you are concerned that your child may have asthma then call our office today at (703) 573-2432 to schedule an evaluation.

By Virginia Pediatric Group
May 01, 2019
Category: Child Care
Tags: Autism  

What is Autism?

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD), or autism, is a developmental disability that can cause significant communication, communication, and behavioral challenges. The thinking, learning, and problem-solving abilities of individuals with autism can range from gifted to severely challenged. Some individuals with autism need only a bit of help in their daily lives; others need more. While there's no cure for autism, early treatment can make a big difference in the lives of many children.

Overview

ASD is the fastest growing serious, developmental disability, affecting an estimated one out of 59 kids in America. Autism begins in early childhood and eventually causes problems functioning in society — at work, in school, and socially, for example. Often kids show symptoms of autism within the first year. Autism impacts how people perceive and socialize with others, causing problems in social interaction and communication.

Symptoms

Autism can look different in different people. Kids with autism have a hard time interacting with others. Social skills difficulties are some of the most common signs. A child with ASD might want to have close relationships but not know how. Most have some problems with communication. Kids with ASD also act in ways that seem unusual. Examples of this can include repetitive behaviors like jumping, hand-flapping, constant moving, fixations on certain objects, fussy eating habits, impulsiveness, and aggressive behavior.

Causes

The exact cause of ASD is not known, but it's believed that genetic and environmental factors are involved. Research shows that ASD tends to run in families. Changes in certain genes increase the risk that a child with develop autism. Research also shows that certain environmental influences may increase autism risk in people who are genetically predisposed to the disorder. Researchers are exploring whether certain factors such as medications, viral infections, or complications during pregnancy play a role in triggering ASD.

Treatment

Treatment options may include nutritional therapy, physical therapy, behavior and communication therapies, educational therapies, family therapies, and medications. No medication can improve the core signs of ASD, but specific medications can help control symptoms. For example, antipsychotic drugs are sometimes used to treat severe behavioral problems; certain medications may be prescribed if your child is hyperactive; and antidepressants may be prescribed for anxiety.


Autism can impact your child's quality of life. If you think your child may have autism, find a pediatrician near you and schedule a consultation. Proper diagnosis and treatment of autism can help your child live a happier, more successful life. The earlier children with autism get help, the greater their chance of treatment success.

By Virginia Pediatric Group
March 19, 2019
Category: Child Care
The harder your children play, the harder they might fall. During childhood, fractures and broken bones are common for children playing or participating in sports. While falls are a common part of childhood,
Detecting a Broken Bone your pediatrician in shares important information to help you understand if your child has a broken bone. 
 
If your child breaks a bone, the classic signs might include swelling and deformity. However, if a break isn’t displaced, it may be harder to tell if the bone is broken or fractured. Some telltale signs that a bone is broken are:
  • You or your child hears a snap or grinding noise as the injury occurs
  • Your child experiences swelling, bruising or tenderness to the injured area
  • It is painful for your child to move it, touch it or press on it
  • The injured part looks deformed

What Happens Next?

If you suspect that your child has a broken bone, it is important that you seek medical care immediately. All breaks, whether mild or severe, require medical assistance. Keep in mind these quick first aid tips:
  • Call 911 - If your child has an 'open break' where the bone has punctured the skin, if they are unresponsive, if there is bleeding or if there have been any injuries to the spine, neck or head, call 911. Remember, better safe than sorry! If you do call 911, do not let the child eat or drink anything, as surgery may be required.
  • Stop the Bleeding - Use a sterile bandage or cloth and compression to stop or slow any bleeding.
  • Apply Ice - Particularly if the broken bone has remained under the skin, treat the swelling and pain with ice wrapped in a towel. As usual, remember to never place ice directly on the skin.
  • Don't Move the Bone - It may be tempting to try to set the bone yourself to put your child out of pain, particularly if the bone has broken through the skin, do not do this! You risk injuring your child further. Leave the bone in the position it is in.
Contact your pediatrician to learn more about broken bones, and how you can better understand the signs and symptoms so your child can receive the care they need right away. 
By Virginia Pediatric Group
January 09, 2019
Category: Child Care
Tags: Vision   Sight  

Does Your Child Have Vision Problems?



Does your child have vision problems? Children learn through their eyes. Healthy vision is critical for children to see the computer and chalkboard, read, write, and even play. Children's eyes should be examined regularly, as many eye conditions and vision problems can be detected and treated early. Here are six signs that your child may have a vision problem.

1. Squinting eyes. If your child is nearsighted then squinting his eyes helps him make his vision a little clearer and can clear up any distorted vision. Nearsighted just means that they can see things that are near them but have a harder time with objects that are far away. Squinting is a coping mechanism to help relieve their blurry vision.

2. Sitting close to the TV. While it's a myth that sitting close to the television will damage your eyes, this habit may be a sign of a vision problem. If your child can't see televised images clearly or always holds a book too close, it could mean she or he is nearsighted.

3. Frequent eye rubbing. Yes, kids often rub their eyes when they're upset or tired. But if your child rubs her eyes while she's trying to concentrate on something, or while she is being active, it could mean that she has a vision problem. Frequently rubbing their eyes can be a sign of eye strain in children. It can be a sign of a focusing issue that causes the eyes to tire easily.

4. Losing place while reading. When children learn to read and are sounding out words, they will frequently use their finger to track which word they're on. But eventually children should be able to focus without losing their place. If after a while your child still uses his finger, ask him to try reading without pointing. If he has trouble, he may have a vision problem.

5. Sensitivity to light. Are your child's eyes sensitive to sunshine or indoor lighting? Many common eye conditions can make people more sensitive to light. If your child's light sensitivity is caused by an eye condition, then treatment for their condition can mean that his eye becomes less light sensitive.

6. Receiving lower grades. If your child is having a hard time seeing what her teacher writes on the board because of poor vision, she may not tell you about it. As a result, her grades can suffer. Most of what kids learn in schools is taught visually. That means if your child has an untreated vision problem, it could affect his or her development.

Yearly eye exams are as important as visits to the pediatrician. If you think your child may have a vision problem, schedule an appointment with a doctor. Early detection and treatment provide the best opportunity to correct a vision problem so your child can learn to see clearly.